Idahohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/31608675@N00/5234504231/

When it comes to outdoor activities, Idaho is always majorly overlooked. With Washington State and Oregon right next door, people tend to skip the land of potatoes. While Idaho may not have much in the way of big city life, when it comes to the great outdoors it has rugged wilderness everywhere without all the crowds that other the other northwestern states attract. Of course, with all the hiking, biking, kayaking and other outdoor activities, people need places to stay. The campgrounds in Idaho are always beautifully taken care of and ready to be used.

Hell's Gate State Park Campground

Hell's Gate State Parkhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/timasters/251455128/

Quick Camp Site Info

# of Sites Price: Comforts: Availability:
29 sites $14 for campers
RVs allowed
Running water
Flush toilets
Hot showers
Reservations Available
Open year-round

 

Hell's Gate State Park is one of the smaller parks in Idaho; however that doesn't mean it's bad. It has little in the way of hiking trails, but the major draw to this park is its location along the Snake River. Each year, thousands of kayakers come to this park to paddle on the river, however even more just pass through. The campground is nestled right up against the river, giving kayakers that are trying to paddle all of Snake River a place to stay. Unfortunately, the campground is mere minutes away from the nearby town of Lewistown. While this is great for campers that need to run to the store for supplies, it often puts a lot of hardcore nature lovers off. Fortunately, Lewistown isn't very large so there will be little in the way of city noise. The campground is nestled in the trees on the bank of the river, but many campsites have views of the river itself. Guests can rent kayaks, go fishing or even charter river guides to take them through all Snake River's beautiful sights on jet boats.

Snowberry Campground in Farragut State Park

Farragut State Parkhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/39718079@N00/382915584/

Quick Camp Site Info

# of Sites Price: Comforts: Availability:
61 sites $12-$18 for campers
RVs allowed
Running water
Flush toilets
Hot showers
Reservations available
Open year-round

 

During World War II, this area was used as a naval training area which makes for quite the historical adventure. With over 4,000 acres of wilderness and located near the massive Lake Pend Oreille, there are five different campsites within the state park. So what makes Snowberry campground better than all the others? Snowberry is the only campground that is located near the shores of Lake Pend Oreille. It is just a half mile from the lakefront and has direct access to the lakefront loop trail as well as several other great trails in the park. While Snowberry is located near the waterfront, it is in a heavily wooded area that is far enough away from the water so that campers don't have to fuss with mosquitoes and other bugs. For those that want the camping experience but don't want to hike or enjoy the lake, the campground is located just six miles from Silverwood Theme Park and Boulder Beach Water Park. Campers are likely to find more than a few campers who are staying during the night just to enjoy the parks during the day.

Eagle Cove Campground at Bruneau Dunes State Park

Bruneau Dunes State Parkhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/5315826523/

Quick Camp Site Info

# of Sites Price: Comforts: Availability:
29 sites $12-$18 for campers
RVs allowed
Running water
Flush toilets
Hot showers
Reservations available
Open year-round

 

What is unique about Idaho is that campers can go from the heavily wooded camping in the north to desert camping in the south. Eagle Cove Campground in Bruneau Dunes State Park is a true desert experience, but due to its close proximity to Little Lake, it can quickly turn into a beach-like adventure. Visitors can sunbathe and swim in the lake or just as easily rent a sand board and go sledding on the dunes. After a long day of fun, campers are treated to sleeping under the wide open sky packed with all those bright desert stars. Due to the unique activities in the area, camping in the Eagle Cove campground is especially popular, more so than the park's other campground due to its location. Reservations are available and indeed recommended as quite a few locals and visitors from neighboring states come to this park for a fun day of sand adventures.

Beaver Creek Campground Near Land of Yankee Fork State Park

Quick Camp Site Info

# of Sites Price: Comforts: Availability:
10 sites $10 for campers
No RVs allowed
No water
Vault toilets
No showers
No reservations
Open June through September

 

The Beaver Creek campground is primely situated between two of Idaho's beautiful natural and cultural areas. On one side is the ominously named vast wilderness area of Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness and on the other is the historical Land of Yankee Fork State Park. What makes this campground so special is that it is drastically underutilized. Many campers may have the whole place to themselves during their stay. As hikers and explorers venture into the higher areas, especially in Land of Yankee Fork, they will be treated to views of the Sawtooth Mountains and White Cloud Peaks in the distance. From this perfectly maintained campground, visitors can head out to all the historical sites within the park like the Challis Bison Kill Site, the ghost towns of Custer, Bayhorse and Bonanza and the Yankee Fork Gold Dredge in the Land of Yankee Fork or choose to go the other direction to visit the untamed wilderness in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness. For those who want a more natural experience, visitors can also raft the white water on the nearby Salmon River and fish the nearby streams.

Massacre Rocks State Park Campground

Massacre Rocks State Park Campgroundhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DSCN6342_massacrerocksboulders_e.jpg

Quick Camp Site Info

# of Sites Price: Comforts: Availability:
42 sites $14 for campers
RVs allowed
Running water
Flush toilets
No showers
No reservations
Open year-round

 

The Massacre Rocks area was prime territory on the Oregon Trail. It was referred to with such ominous names as the "Gate of Death" and "Devil's Gate" because the pass through the rocks was so narrow that only one wagon could move through at a time and falling rocks was an ever present danger. The sole campground in the park is located just two miles from Register Rock which bears the name of passing travellers on the Oregon Trail. It's really the park surrounding this campground that makes it truly special. The campsites are centrally located so that all of the trails within Massacre Rocks can be accessed easily. Visitors are just minutes from Snake River where they can rent canoes or kayaks to go explore the water or nearby islands, but most choose to head out and walk in between the narrow wagon passes and follow the old ruts where wagons once soldiered through.

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